trigger

Darling River Drive

National Parks and Wildlife Service government exhibition / interpretive
Toorale National Park comprises of 91,000 hectares of land with frontages to the Darling and Warrego Rivers. The park is located southwest of the township of Bourke in northwestern NSW.
Trigger, in collaboration with GML Heritage engaged with stakeholders, such as the Aboriginal Joint Management Committee, to conceive an Interpretation Plan and provide a range of innovative interpretative design concepts to create an experience that inspires and engages visitors.
Our multi-disciplinary team employed an interconnected approach to this project, comprising physical, digital and program layers. The layers form complementary and unique experiences for visitors before, during and after the visit. Communicating the heritage values of the park through the interpretive design and content, as well as via marketing initiatives, was integral to the strategy.
Trigger is implementing interpretive concepts over a 3 year period. Stage 1 physical interpretives installed in the park include are located at Mt Talowla and beside the Darling River.
Interpretives on the Darling River focus on the river and its central importance for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people historically and today, offering different perspectives and uses of the river. The days of the paddlesteamers is evoked by an interpretive which features a laser cut corten steel paddlesteamer that appears to float on the rippling water of the Darling. This is a playful visual way to communicate what it must have been like to experience a busy transport corridor of puffing paddle steamers. The 4 Darling River interpretives sit comfortably in the landscape, seeking not to contrast with it but to compliment it and communicate deeper meanings and history.

Mt Talowla

National Parks and Wildlife Service government exhibition / interpretive
Toorale National Park comprises of 91,000 hectares of land with frontages to the Darling and Warrego Rivers. The park is located southwest of the township of Bourke in northwestern NSW.
Trigger, in collaboration with GML Heritage engaged with stakeholders, such as the Aboriginal Joint Management Committee, to conceive an Interpretation Plan and provide a range of innovative interpretative design concepts to create an experience that inspires and engages visitors.
Our multi-disciplinary team employed an interconnected approach to this project, comprising physical, digital and program layers. The layers form complementary and unique experiences for visitors before, during and after the visit. Communicating the heritage values of the park through the interpretive design and content, as well as via marketing initiatives, was integral to the strategy.
Trigger is implementing interpretive concepts over a 3 year period. Stage 1 physical interpretives installed in the park include are located at Mt Talowla and beside the Darling River.
A series of 11 bespoke cast bronze plaques at Mt Talowla interprets the site’s history as a vantage point for looking out across the landscape for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people. The 270º views allow a visual connection between Toorale National Park and adjoining Gundabooka National Park. Installing interpretation at ground level evokes the importance of the shared earth and the landscape – we must bend to it, not it to us.

A Capital Collection

National Capital Authority government exhibition / interpretive
'A Capital Collection – Our History in Fashion' examines the story of Canberra through fashion. Four key moments in Canberra's history are interpreted in this travelling exhibition. The exhibition design creates a ‘landscape’, both physically and contexturally, a mix of elegantly curved sculptural forms, key images and messages. The aim is to communicate historical stories within a contemporary framework.
Open display was an important design component, allowing greater engagement between visitors and objects. The floor carries graphic arcs that visually represent 'story arcs' and set the position of the illuminated curved screens. This visual language subtley echoes the distinctive town planning of Canberra. Although more correctly the shape Canberra’s town plan is based on is the ‘triangle’, many would relate and identify with the circular motif of the city. The exhibition contains a number of innovative design ideas. Most striking are the slender illuminated screens. Their creation involved a very complex set of design and construction issues, belying their visual simplicity. The screens are a design, lighting and engineering achievement not seen before in exhibition design.
The exhibition architecture also functions as its crating system. Therefore the exhibition requires no storage - an important innovation that allows the exhibition to travel to more destinations. The exhibition can be reconfigured to fit in a variety of different sized spaces. For one location it splits into two sections. A bespoke table design for a series of iPads, showing audio visual content, is also part of the exhibition.


Curators: Roslyn Hull, Pamela Owen Architect: Carola Salazar, Project Management: Rob Tindal, Melanie Dodd


Toorale National Park

The Office of Environment and Heritage government exhibition / interpretive
Trigger in association with Godden Mackay Logan Heritage Consultants were commissioned by the Office of Environment and Heritage (OEH) National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS) to prepare an Interpretation Strategy and Implementation Plan for Toorale National Park. Toorale is a former pastoral station, once one of the largest in the world, located an hour outside of Bourke, NSW. Elements such as the parks indigenous, pastoral/irrigation history were explored in a consultative manner.n We created a suite of physical and digital interpretation concepts allowing the visitor to understand, imagine and experience the place’s special history and to fully appreciate the natural value of the landscape. These concepts will be realised as a part of long term plan. The park is due to open late 2013.

Australian Inventions

Powerhouse Museum museum exhibition / interpretive
Trigger designed an interpretive wall, title and theme panels for a mini exhibition: "Australian Inventions' at the Powerhouse Museum. The main object featured is a mouse-trap machine, designed by A.W Standfield. It was used continuously at the Baxter Road factory, Mascot, between 1942 and 2000, producing about 96 million mouse traps. The design creates a factory/warehouse space and echoes the whirring circular forms of the machine through circular information panel discs. Sketches from some of the inventors appear as 'graffiti' on the wall. Trigger worked in collaboration with the Powerhouse Museum and designer Carola Salazar. The mini exhibition is a satellite exhbibit of the 'Wallace and Gromit: World of Invention Exhibition'.

Final photograph by Geoff Friend, The Powerhouse Museum


The Snakeman Show

Office of Environment and Heritage government exhibition / interpretive
The NSW Office of Environment and Heritage (OEH), National Parks and Wildlife Service commissioned Trigger to revitalise the Snakeman exhibition in the Laperouse Museum, Sydney. The resulting 'The Snakeman Show' traces the unique lives of the daring Snakeman (and Snakewomen) who have dazzled audiences at La Perouse and elsewhere in Australia for over a century. The exhibition is comprised of a series of specially designed wall mounted light-boxes, featuring astonishing photographs and displaying objects, telling the story of the performers and the impact they had on the consciousness of a country.

Thank you to John Cann, Marie Slaight, Adrian Brannan, Chee Lam, Ben Khan, Mary Lou Harriman, Phil Antonios, Signwave Newtown and Gosia Dudek for their contributions to this project.


Wilderquest Installation

NSW National Parks and Wildlife government exhibition / interpretive
Wilderquest is a digital and online initiative, at present featuring a website and ipad app, by NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service to engage children with their natural environments. Trigger's role was to translate Wilderquest's online experience to a tangible, sensory exhibition installation. Our design encompassed exhibition design, film for the large format LCD screen, push button interactive activity boxes, a live animal enclosure and the use of real plants to support the core NPWS values of sustainability, nature and authenticity. The design also has inbuilt modularity and flexibility to adapt to multiple sizes and configurations. The first display at the NSW Royal Easter Show has been extremely successful. It was one of the most popular installations and won a ribbon for 'best exhibition stand', Kid's World section.

Photography by Nick Cubbin, courtesy of OEH.


The Wiggles Exhibition

The Powerhouse Museum museum exhibition / interpretive
Trigger designed educational, interactive and entertaining environmental graphics for 'The Wiggles Exhibition' travelling exhibition in partnership with the Powerhouse Museum. The major design challenge was presenting appropriate content within an environment that is engaging for children and adults, together and independently. The Wiggles exhibition is two interwoven exhibitions, one for children with opportunities to discover, play and interact and one for the adults who will accompany them, essentially telling the story of The Wiggles’ career. Trigger worked extensively with the Powerhouse Museum’s ‘Family and Community Experiences’ team to ensure that the design was consistent with the principles of early childhood education. The Wiggles core brand values - ‘fun, inclusiveness and learning’ inform the exhibition’s entertaining and educational graphics. Trigger was also involved in developing the marketing and media campaign for the exhibition.

Photography by Marinco Kojdanovski, courtesy of PHM


The 80s are Back

Powerhouse Museum museum exhibition / interpretive
Trigger, in association with Toland Architects designed ‘The 80s Are Back’, a major exhibition at the Powerhouse Museum that inspired thought and reflection on the culture of the 80s. The unconventional and adventurous exhibition design has won accolades for the Powerhouse.

For visitors, the journey began through a ‘time-warp’ tunnel flooded with projections, lighting and sounds to stimulate and disorientate. The exhibition was an immersive experience of interactive displays and static objects, including retro computer gaming and an interactive ‘music’ cube installation of 80’s music for dancing. Over one thousand Magic Cubes were used for the feature title wall, around which a special event was created to engage Museum volunteers and staff.

Trigger Toland’s responsibilities began with naming and branding the exhibition, through to the overall 3D concept, design of both interactive and audio-visual displays and graphics. The Trigger Toland team also worked with the Powerhouse team on the design of the overall marketing campaign, exterior environmental design, print and web design, live action video art direction, photographic art direction, graphics for web, merchandise design, Museum staff uniform design and design of iphone applications.
The task was complex and the time frame was tight – just 12 weeks from initial sketch designs through to documentation, construction and fabrication, installation and public launch.

It was featured on overseas news providers such as the BBC. It has created an invigorating buzz for the Museum and has been instrumental in attracting new visitor demographics. The exhibition was extended 3 times due to popular demand.

Baitlayers and Babbling Brooks

Shear Outback Museum museum exhibition / interpretive
Trigger was commissioned to design a travelling exhibition investigating Shearer’s Cooks – the folklore of the shearers cook profession; its history; conditions in the cookhouse, now and in the past; the Cook’s role in looking after the physical and emotional well being of the shearers; the cooks working today; and the type of food prepared. To help evoke the atmosphere of shearers’ cooks working conditions in the exhibition design materials in their natural state were used and the geometry seen in many shearing sheds was referenced. A table laden with photographic food images displays the typical amount of food one shearer would consume in a day and simulates a typical table setting. Overcoming budget restraints required design ingenuity in the design. Inspiration and direction was derived from the philosophies and practices of shearers’ cooks – using available and cost effective materials and tools in inventive ways. Triangular shapes cut out of the structural plywood panels removed more than 50% of the exhibition’s weight, whilst maintaining rigidity, making the exhibition lighter and less expensive to transport. The innovative concertina design of the exhibition allowed much of the structures to be folded up and stored flat for transport. Typography was developed from a study of stencilling on wool bales and was hand stencilled to the image panels.

Yanga: People, Country, Lake

National Parks and Wildlife Service government exhibition / interpretive
Yanga was an iconic pastoral station, known across the Riverina district from the 1850s. The property was the largest freehold title in Australia before it was purchased by the National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS) in 2005. In May 2009 Yanga National Park opened to visitors.
As part of Yanga National Park, People, Lake, Country explores the pervasive interaction between nature and culture. The exhibition connects memory, history and place through what has been a focal point for the area – water. The exhibition is a feature of the Yanga Homestead Precinct and is installed in the Cook’s Cottage building. It houses and displays Yanga’s movable heritage.
The innovative exhibition design uses simple and honest forms that are thematically appropriate and sit lightly within the heritage building; they provide a sense of openness and space in three small rooms. Clever use of soft spotlighting, a colour palette drawn from the lake-bed and innovative use of audio visuals helps create individual atmospheres for each room. Trigger conceived the renovation of the cottage interior, and designed the exhibition and all graphics.

Hot as Hell

Hay Museums museum exhibition / interpretive
‘Hot as Hell’ was an exhibition about the effects of heat and how rural Australian coped with it, staged across the country town of Hay’s five museums. To evocatively communicate the exhibition theme all interpretative structures were designed to resemble melted forms – there are no straight lines – and swimsuit fabric was the material used for the interpretive text and image panels. The exhibition had an interactive component, inviting visitors to tell their stories about the heat, and to read other visitors’ stories. These stories were arranged in ‘scrolls’ which were held in place by a gauze panel built into the interpretive structures. The exhibition also included supportive print material which won the best poster award at the Museums Australia Multimedia and Publication Design Awards in 2005.

Marc Newson: Design works

Marc Newson & Powerhouse Museum museum exhibition / interpretive
Trigger worked with iconic Australian designer Richard Allan to develop the visual identity for the Powerhouse Museum’s exhibition ‘Marc Newson: Design Works’, a retrospective of the famous designer’s work. The design features a profile portrait of Newson against a background of stars, referencing the designer’s reputation as a design ‘rock star’. Trigger was responsible for developing and applying the identity across all areas of environmental, print and advertising. Trigger also designed all exhibition graphics including a 20 metre graphic feature wall which charts Newson’s journey through his sketches and landmark design achievements.

follow us on:

facebooktwitter